Long we have been used to tech stocks trading at price multiples (price/earnings) at more than the industry standard has been comfortable with for decades. Benjamin Graham’s ideal PE is between 10 and 15 dollars. The Dow Industrial is trading at 25 PE, the S&P 500 is trading at 25 PE. If you thought that the Dow and the S&P 500 are overvalued by Graham’s standards, here’s a look at the tech industry valuations. Amazons PE is trading at 316, Netflix is trading at 206 PE, Dropbox has a negative PE. However, what was evident this past two weeks is that these tech stocks are more correlated than initially thought. When one tech stock sneezes, the entire market catches a cold.

Facebook has fallen 14% since 16 March when the news of privacy breach by Cambridge Analytica has spread. This caused Apple to fall more than 5%, Alphabet and Amazon have fallen more than 8%, and last but not least Twitter fell more than 19%.

However, one knows that a cold eventually ends, and with these company’s being sugar-coated with net margins of more than 20%, and growth potential, innovation and barriers to entry, it is important to keep watch for those companies. They are more likely than not that they are trading at a discount. Most of these tech companies have very strong balance sheets. This means they are relatively low leveraged. A hawkish fed of increasing interest rates has lesser of an effect on their valuation extended to the end of 2018.

However, as a kid knows exactly when to catch an ice cream truck, a good trader knows when to enter a stock. Technical analysis 101 serves a good purpose. Many mistakes made by students these days are getting excited very fast, being scared to fast, and not admitting one’s own mistake like a toddler refusing to get out of a car.

As long as markets are trading above 50-day moving average, the trader should be thinking “buy the dip”, many do the mistake of directly entering the trade once the stock price has fallen, however the truth is to better forgo some profit for a safety margin to allow one’s self to be confident that the stock is actually reverting. The 100-day moving average, this line provides the support between the 50 days and 200 days. If it does not hold support, there is a high probability that the 200-day moving average is the next stop, this is the deeper pullback in bull markets. 200-day moving average, this is an indicator telling you which side a trader should be one, either a bull or a bear market.

It is important to know that moving averages are not the Holy Grail of trading they are tools to help the trader capture a trend in their own time frame.

The point is will tech stocks retaliate and gain back valuation and return to their highs? Or will they descend even further? Either way, liquidate and hold 100% cash and wait and watch for those moving averages, because at this level they have attractive risk/reward ratio.

 

Author:

Bassem Mneimne

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